Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Making sense of haplogroup H - 16519c

Descendant of Rachel and Leah?

I grew up hearing about my German ancestry, and that "German stubborness" that we all seemed to have inherited ----My maternal roots tracing back as far as Baden Baden, Germany. I can't remember my grandmother, Ruth, without picturing her with a bible.

Baden Baden


My great-great grandma Caroline, great-great grandpa Fritz, and my great grandpa, Freddy, as a little boy.

My maternal Great-great grandpa Fritz Groat.

Here is what I have discovered about my test results: Haplogroup H (16519c)

It is hypothesized that 16519C represents the mtDNA of the matriarchs of Israel, Leah and Rachel.
Because of my great grandmother, Stella Ruth, being a mystery woman, my attentions have been drawn to her marriage to my great grandfather Groat.

My g-great grandpa worked for the railroad.

The surname, Groat, just so happens to be Dutch, which was given in the middle ages to thick or large coins.

Ever heard the saying, "Blood without groats is nothing?" meaning "family without fortune is worthless." Or "Not worth a groat" is an old saying meaning "not worth a penny".



Technically, Groat is derived from Groth --- some of my early ancestors changed their name from Groth to Groat when they came to America. My Groth/Groat ancestors, Fritz (nickname for Fredderick?) and his wife Caroline, only spoke German. They both were born in Germany and were known to have owned a butcher shop.

My great grandmother, Stella Ruth, had married into the Groat family on April 12, 1900 - in Pulaski County, Indiana. Going through the history of immigration, it is noted that Indiana became one of the first states (Ohio was the other) west of the Alleghenies to host permanent Jewish communities. The seeking of better lives, better economic conditions, and more freedom, fueled a "migration fever" among Germans in general.

My great grandmother, Stella Ruth, remains a mystery.
Unfortunately, Haplogroup H, is very broad with the mutation that is shared by a few additional haplogroups, mainly K.

Perhaps I will direct my attentions to the Groat line and test my maternal/paternal line for more answers.

Great grandpa Fred, Great Grandma Stella Ruth, and baby grandma Ruth. Counting in my Aunt, this makes me a fourth generation RUTH!

(click to enlarge)

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yes...it is Jewish...my mtDna also fall whitin that Haplogroup H-16519c; I am also a Jew as well....Nice Job!

S.Alomar

Anonymous said...

I am also part jewish, by way of German ancestry, and have discovered this page by pure coincidence, after being identified as 16519C. Very interesting.

Kathy Matlock Wigley said...

I am so happy to know what the HVR1 16519C means. I am Haplogroup H23.... with the same 16519C!

Judith Wood said...

The mtDNA variation 16519C shows up in many many European as well as Indian groups. Mine happens to be U3a...Spanish Lithuanian Polish ROMA! In other words, a gypsy (that surprised me mightily). But 16519C is also the signature of 4 of the 7 Eves. Helena is the biggest group sporting the signature 16519C. (H2a2)...Helena lived in Eastern Europe 25,000 yrs ago.  large concentrations are in the Caucasus. Began 25,000 years ago.  Helena concentrations are highest in Germany and Scotland.

My maternal ancestry is the Scottish Highlands.
16519C is known as an unstable and active (mutating) gene. It shows up everywhere!

Judith Wood said...

The mtDNA variation 16519C shows up in many many European as well as Indian groups. Mine happens to be U3a...Spanish Lithuanian Polish ROMA! In other words, a gypsy (that surprised me mightily). But 16519C is also the signature of 4 of the 7 Eves. Helena is the biggest group sporting the signature 16519C. (H2a2)...Helena lived in Eastern Europe 25,000 yrs ago.  large concentrations are in the Caucasus. Began 25,000 years ago.  Helena concentrations are highest in Germany and Scotland.

My maternal ancestry is the Scottish Highlands.
16519C is known as an unstable and active (mutating) gene. It shows up everywhere!

Helen Ruth said...

Lots of changes over the years since I had originally tested my mtDNA. Due to technology, we can now test further to narrow things down. One of these days I plan to test further on the maternal results. As for my paternal side, DNA has made a significant contribution, as we've tested significantly on upgrades and have no doubts on our semitic originations.